The FLANEUR … an urban explorer.

BEL’OCCHIO   … the beautiful eye

TO BE A FLÂNEUR

Gustave-Caillebotte-Paris-Street-Rainy-Day-1877

To walk the city streets.

rue-halevy-seen-from-the-sixth-floor

To be a connoisseur of corners and investigate the unfamiliar.

caillebotte_balcon

To simply stand and stare and let the city envelope you.

paintings-by-gustave-caillebotte-4

 To become an urban explorer.

To glory in the bridges and buildings.

portrait-of-henri-cordier-gustave-caillebotte

The writers.

The artists.

The scholars.

the-orange-trees-or-the-artist-s-brother-in-his-garden-1878

The street stroller.

The amateur detective.

The urban explorer.

This Flâneur.

FLÂNEUR – a literary type of 19th century France.  A man of leisure, the idler, the urban explorer. .

Baudelaire characterized the Flâneur as a “gentlemen stroller of the city streets”.

Gustine Caillebotte  a painter and member and patron of the group of artists known as  Impressionists captured them on canvas.

Eugene Arget, a  flâneur,  photographed the streets and people.

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15 thoughts on “The FLANEUR … an urban explorer.

  1. I’m with you, dreaming of those streets, the little unexpected sights and encounters, the feel of the gardens, walking without destination, sitting and letting life flow around you, all the joy and melancholy and memories, the sense of connectedness to everything. I guess that makes us flaneusses?

  2. Flâneur- tastique, Virginia! I love the words and works, along with your eye. Your mini-films are always thoroughly enjoyable, of course. I’ve always been a big time fan of Gustave Caillebotte. A few years ago, I got to spend time with his “Paris Street; Rainy Day” at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was great fun interesting watching people interact with it! I stayed for a full hour, smitten. I’m now off to find out where he lived on Boulevard Haussmann. Thanks for the stroll! T.

    • Long. long ago in a place harsh and relentless – begins this story – in the land of New France a group of gentlemen home-sick for France, and wanting a little cheering up, formed L’Order de Bontemps (The Order of Good Cheer).The year was 1606.
      The Charter:
      To share in the fellowship and good cheer enjoyed among the “nevoux noblise” of New France as they wintered together in Port-Royal and to revel in the Glory of King Henry lV.
      Our Fellowship of Good Cheer spans time and space and takes us to other worlds. A world where we all live happily ever after.

  3. Oh Virginia, I love this post! What fab pics and great history!
    The best though… is it feels like your gown. I made a sharp turn in it’s feel, not the silhouette or fact it’s being made out of scraps and rags, but the treatment.
    I’m very inspired by it, by you!

  4. Pingback: Two Short Books Set In France – Escape Into Reality

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